Current News

In early January, the first genome sequence of Sars-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID-19 — was released under the moniker "Wuhan-1". This string of 30,000 letters (the A, T, C and Gs of the genetic code) marked day one in the race to understand the genetics of this newly discovered coronavirus. Now, a further 100,000 coronavirus genomes sampled from COVID-19 patients in over 100 countries have joined Wuhan-1. Geneticists around the world are mining the data for answers. Where did Sars-CoV-2 come from? When did it start infecting humans? How is the virus mutating — and does it matter? Sars-CoV-2 genomics, much like the virus itself, went big and went global.

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Up to 206 Million People Reached and Over 5.4 Million Trained in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Worldwide: The 2019 International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation World Restart a Heart Initiative

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The research does not prove that infected children are contagious, but it should influence the debate about reopening schools, some experts said. It has been a comforting refrain in the national conversation about reopening schools: Young children are mostly spared by the coronavirus and don’t seem to spread it to others, at least not very often.

 

But on Thursday, a study introduced an unwelcome wrinkle into this smooth narrative.

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The first COVID-19 patient in the U.S. to receive a double-lung transplant was discharged from the hospital this week, according to news reports.

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Further notification

A Nature study authored by a global team of scientists and led by Sumit Chanda, Ph.D., professor at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, has identified 21 existing drugs that stop the replication of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

 

The scientists analyzed one of the world's largest collections of known drugs for their ability to block the replication of SARS-CoV-2, and reported 100 molecules with confirmed antiviral activity in laboratory tests. Of these, 21 drugs were determined to be effective at concentrations that could be safely achieved in patients. Notably, four of these compounds were found to work synergistically with remdesivir, a current standard-of-care treatment for COVID-19.

 

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A new blood test demonstrated remarkable promise in discriminating between persons with and without Alzheimer's disease and in persons at known genetic risk may be able to detect the disease as early as 20 years before the onset of cognitive impairment, according to a large international study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and simultaneously presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference.

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Humans once assumed our planet was the physical center of the solar system, so it's no surprise that we also think highly of consciousness, the apparently unique quality that allows our species to contemplate such matters.

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Berlin. Approximately one fifth of COVID-19patients admitted to German hospitals between the end of February and mid-April died. For patients receiving ventilation, the mortality rate was 53 percent. For those not receiving ventilation, the rate was significantly lower at 16percent. 17percent of all patients were ventilated during this period. These are the main resultsofan analysis by WIdO, the research institute of the AOK health insurance, DIVI, the German Interdisciplinary AssociationofCritical Care andEmergency Medicine, and Technische Universität Berlin published in the specialist medical journal, The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. Data were analyzed for 10,000patients withaconfirmed COVID-19infectionadmitted to 920German hospitals between 26February and 19April2020. The joint study providesnationwide and representative findingson the treatment of COVID-19patients in Germany based on AOK administrative claims data, which cover almost one third of the German population. Onefocus is on thesituation regarding ventilated patients. Approximately onefifth (22percent) of COVID-19patients treated in hospitals died (Figure 1). The mortality rate for men(25percent)was 6 percentage pointshigher than that for women (19 percent). Mortality among older patients was very high, irrespective of gender: 27percent of patients aged 70 to 79 died, with the number rising to 38percent forpatients over 80years....

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