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    The virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is stable for several hours to days in aerosols and on surfaces, according to a new study from National Institutes of Health, CDC, UCLA and Princeton University scientists The New England Journal of Medicine. The scientists found that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was detectable in aerosols for up to three hours, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel. The results provide key information about the stability of SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19 disease, and suggests that people may acquire the virus through the air and after touching contaminated objects. The study information was widely shared during the past two weeks after the researchers placed the contents on a preprint server to quickly share their data with colleagues.

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    On March 16, 2020, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute gave the first-ever injection of an investigational vaccine for the 2019 novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, to volunteers participating in phase one of the federally sponsored clinical trial.

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    Moderna, Inc., (Nasdaq: MRNA) a clinical stage biotechnology company pioneering messenger RNA (mRNA) therapeutics and vaccines to create a new generation of transformative medicines for patients, today announced that the first participant has been dosed in the Phase 1 study of the Company’s mRNA vaccine (mRNA-1273) against the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). This Phase 1 study is being conducted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under its own Investigational New Drug (IND) application.

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    Certain purchases are better than others at sparking people's in-the-moment happiness, according to new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin.

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    Less than 8 percent of people who suffer from cardiac arrest outside of the hospital survive the incident, according to the American Heart Association. To improve survivorship and better administer life-saving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), researchers and physicians at The Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research and North Shore University Hospital developed a novel approach called Mechanical, Team-Focused, Video-Reviewed Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (MTV-CPR) to video record, review and reform practices to improve performance. Their research results published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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    In the past, there has been much excitement over research that purported to show a link between changes in a woman's cycle and how attracted she was to men behaving in different ways. However, research at the University of Göttingen using the largest sample size to date questions these results. The new research showed that shifts in women's cycles did not affect their preferences for men's behaviour. The researchers found, however, that when fertile, women found all men slightly more attractive and, irrespective of their hormone cycle, flirtier men were evaluated as being more attractive for sexual relationships but less attractive for long-term relationships. The results were published in Psychological Science.

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    Polluted air is a public health hazard that cannot be evaded. It is widely known that long-term exposure to air pollution enhances the risks of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry and the University Medical Center Mainz now calculated in a new study that the global, public loss of life expectancy caused by air pollution is higher than many other risk factors such as smoking, infectious diseases or violence.

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    Whether patients suffer from acutely or chronically narrowed coronary vessels – quantitative imaging techniques are indispensable when it comes to detecting and treating circulatory disorders of the heart muscle or preventing them in time. An interdisciplinary team, in which scientists from the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) also played a leading role, has now for the first time determined which method is best suited for patients with different clinical pictures in order to measure the heart’s blood supply. The researchers have published the results as a joint consensus statement in Nature Reviews Cardiology.

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    Cochlear implants restore hearing in deaf people to an amazingly high level. In order to optimize such implants, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a computer model which predicts the neuronal activation patterns that the implant creates in the auditory nerve fibers. As a starting point, the researchers used a high-resolution representation of the human inner ear.

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